Yomi apron dress (a)

45 000 ISK

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Yomigæri apron dress (a) – hand-dyed with rust. Straight cut with storm flaps in front and back. Shoulders are permanently attached with rivets.
This piece is identical to Yomi apron dress (b) but has a belt/ribbons instead of press fasteners on the sides.

Unisex

Material: 100% cotton
Size: Included in the price is a customization for your size (you will be contacted after purchasing)

The pieces for Yomigæri were inspired by a dress a woman from Eura was buried in, around the year 1000. All we know about the woman is based on archaeological findings and the dress was the first ancient Finnish dress that was fully reconstructed.
We even know the colorants used to dye it because of the fragments of fabric that were conserved by the copper rust from the decorations and jewellery on it.
She was clearly a woman of high social status as evidenced by the abundance of jewellery and expensive pigments, like indigo imported from Asia.

The grave findings of “Euran emäntä”
Reconstruction of the Euran Emäntä costume

 

Yomi apron dress (a)

45 000 ISK

Yomigæri apron dress (a) – hand-dyed with rust. Straight cut with storm flaps in front and back. Shoulders are permanently attached with rivets.
This piece is identical to Yomi apron dress (b) but has a belt/ribbons instead of press fasteners on the sides.

Unisex

Material: 100% cotton
Size: Included in the price is a customization for your size (you will be contacted after purchasing)

The pieces for Yomigæri were inspired by a dress a woman from Eura was buried in, around the year 1000. All we know about the woman is based on archaeological findings and the dress was the first ancient Finnish dress that was fully reconstructed.
We even know the colorants used to dye it because of the fragments of fabric that were conserved by the copper rust from the decorations and jewellery on it.
She was clearly a woman of high social status as evidenced by the abundance of jewellery and expensive pigments, like indigo imported from Asia.

The grave findings of “Euran emäntä”
Reconstruction of the Euran Emäntä costume

 

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